New EU road safety measures could limit all cars to 70 mph

"Safety is not the absence of danger; it is the absence of ignorance."

-Vol Libre: The journal of the Soaring Association of Canada 3/98 June/July)

From RED

This Q5 will turn you into a bonafide snowflake.

Ouch.

School locked down after student brings thermometer to class

These guys have “Cable cutters” on their planes, just in case.  They’re just blades on the landing gear…

Wings level

Wings level

From Leddit…

From Leddit…

From Cannonball Run 2

From Cannonball Run 2

Digging the necktie / T-shirt combo.

Digging the necktie / T-shirt combo.

Flying in Alaska - Special Considerations

Alaska is a very complex aviation environment. Flying safely here requires thorough planning and special attention. When well planned, flying in Alaska presents no particular problems and can be very inspiring. Alaska summer flying weather is generally good with long daylight hours. But expect delays due to adverse weather and marginal VFR conditions. Do not push the weather. Weather reporting points are far apart. Ask for and give pilot reports often. Though VFR flight plans are not required, they are strongly recommended. Much of Alaska is mountainous. The correct entrance to mountain passes can be deceptive. Dead-end box canyons are common. Airports are separated by great distances so fuel planning must be accurate and alternative routes/airports seriously considered. Magnetic variation may be as much as 25 degrees east. Be vigilant in tracking your flight across the ground. Icing conditions are encountered year round. Most of Alaska’s runways are gravel. Many are not lighted. Airspace around major population centers can be quite crowded and contain special restrictions and requirements.

Alaska Statute 02.35.110 Emergency Rations & Equipment requires that an airman may not make a flight inside the state with an aircraft unless emergency equipment is carried as follows:

  1. The minimum equipment during the summers months is: food for each occupant for one week; one axe or hatchet; one first aid kit; an assortment of fishing tackle such as hooks, flies, and sinkers; one knife; fire starter; one mosquito headnet for each occupant; and two signaling devices such as colored smoke bombs, pistol shells, etc. sealed in metal containers. 
     
  2. In addition to the above, the following must be carried as minimum equipment from October 15 to April 1 of each year: one pair of snowshoes; one sleeping bag; one wool blanket for each occupant over four.

Dear God!